Harbinger Wars II: Prelude Review: She’s a Real Live Wire

Livewire (Amanda McKee) is one of the most powerful psiots in the Valiant universe. Toyo Harada who mentored her and Peter an original Harbinger are powerful in their own right. But Livewire’s psiot ability deals with technology and in the 21st century that makes her the most dangerous. In ‘Harbinger Wars II: Prelude’ the massacre of Rook, Michigan continues to reverberate. The ones being targeted now are under Livewire’s care and she’s not one to be played with.

From recalibrating pacemakers to turning the world back to the 1950’s Livewire is taking the first strike in not being hunted. This series is perhaps reminiscent of a regime trying to counterstrike what they believe is a danger to their own power. Men in black suits who treat free-will like a yellow traffic light are killing children. As a psiot and a Black woman, Livewire being the impetus of this crossover event isn’t an accident. Her psiot abilities are the danger to the status quo and in having her actualized ability trump her blackness is going to be something interesting to see unfold. What’s more Livewire isn’t a child. She’s been a member of UNITY and has connections with some of the most important characters in Valiant. The thing is seeing how these sides will match up.

On the last page of this prelude issue we see Livewire looming in the background. To the left and lower right of her are fellow psiots, including Faith, one of the more popular Valiant characters. Then there’s her ex-teammates X-O Manowar and Bloodshot. Manowar (Aric of Dacia) may sit this one out. After all he knows what it’s like to be hunted down. As a Visigoth Aric was kidnapped by the alien race the Vine. After losing his arm in an escape and being bonded with the sentient Manowar armor, he returns to earth hundreds of years later. For Aric he won’t allow anyone to make him bring in his friend and a group of children. Then there’s Bloodshot. Unsure of whether this takes place after he returns from the future or before his daughter dramatically ages, he may just help Livewire. Bloodshot also knows what it’s like to be used by the government. At this point in his life Bloodshot can’t tell his implanted memories from his real ones. A secret agency did that to him. Coupling with the idea that he freed the Generation Zero teens from a secret agency who used their psiot abilities to create assassins, and his feeling towards secret governments Bloodshot has more to gain in aiding Livewire and the other Harbingers.

Overall this issue works for established fans of this comic-book world. Hopefully this won’t be one of those crossover events where nothing affects the continuity of the flagship titles. This crossover should matter or have some affect in comic-book issues to come.

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Donna-Lyn Washington

I’ve been the go-to person of obscure information that I’ve picked up from reading, watching movies and television and a fetish for 80’s-90’s music since I learned to talk. I enjoy the fact that for a long time I was the only one who knew that “Three’s Company” was a rip-off of the British Comedy “Man About the House.” Although I am knowledgeable on a multitude of subjects, my lisp and stutter would get in the way of my explanations and I could only save a dry-witty phrase for the written word – so I consider writing to be a path-working to fully express my ideas. Knowing the terror of formal writing, I currently teach at Kingsborough Community College in hopes of helping others overcome the fear that once gripped my heart as a speaker of words.

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I’ve been the go-to person of obscure information that I’ve picked up from reading, watching movies and television and a fetish for 80’s-90’s music since I learned to talk. I enjoy the fact that for a long time I was the only one who knew that “Three’s Company” was a rip-off of the British Comedy “Man About the House.” Although I am knowledgeable on a multitude of subjects, my lisp and stutter would get in the way of my explanations and I could only save a dry-witty phrase for the written word – so I consider writing to be a path-working to fully express my ideas. Knowing the terror of formal writing, I currently teach at Kingsborough Community College in hopes of helping others overcome the fear that once gripped my heart as a speaker of words.

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