Review Fix’s 2011 Tribeca Film Festival Coverage: ‘Bye Bye Super 8’ Review

The end of a precious piece of film has come to an end, and with this special style of shooting, a movie goes out into the sunset. This unique style of Kodachrome will make you appreciate just how unique and fantastic this type of film really was.

An interesting look at a young boy’s childhood shot in a unique and obsolete style known as Kodachrome, “Bye Bye Super 8” is a short film at the Tribeca Film Festival that explores the different colors of Kodachrome, while at the same time giving the audience a farewell to one of the longest used types of film in the business.

“Bye Bye Super 8” is directed by John Kramer, who gives a farewell to the now obsolete Kodachrome film. On December 31, 2010, the only Kodachrome lab left in the world stopped making the most famous family film of all time, which was the Super 8 film K40. With this, Kramer was inspired to create a tribute. Simply put, this film features some of the most colors in the world. The different camera angles show the magnificent colors of flowers and other beautiful surroundings that nature gives us.

This short film was filled with life and comfort. As you experience the childhood memories in the film, there are different elements that allow you to explore how special Kodachrome really was. The style that this film was shot in will remind you of the opening to “The Wonder Years” television show, minus the catchy tune.

“Bye Bye Super 8” is a film that brings a tear to your eyes, because it is powerful enough to allow you to reminisce on your childhood past, just like the film explores. Kramer does a phenomenal job of putting together a piece of art that is very unique due to the way the shots display a style that will probably never be seen in film again.

As for Kodachrome, it was nice to see it go off in style.

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Nick Valente

At the site, I'm a music, television and graphic novel kind of guy and that's what I'll be writing for the most part. Expect some book and music reviews as well though [insert demon horns here]. I grew up in Bensonhurst Brooklyn, the same neighborhood many of the best mafia films of our day were based on, idolizing guys like Robert Deniro, Martin Scorsese and Al Pacino. I'm also a big sports fan and follow the New York Yankees immensely.
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About Nick Valente 298 Articles
At the site, I'm a music, television and graphic novel kind of guy and that's what I'll be writing for the most part. Expect some book and music reviews as well though [insert demon horns here]. I grew up in Bensonhurst Brooklyn, the same neighborhood many of the best mafia films of our day were based on, idolizing guys like Robert Deniro, Martin Scorsese and Al Pacino. I'm also a big sports fan and follow the New York Yankees immensely.

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